IMPC at SfN 2018

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By IMPC

Published 29th October 2018

We are excited to be attending the the SfN 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego starting this weekend. We are looking forward to engaging with researchers and to raising awareness of the IMPC as a resource. If you are attending the conference and want to learn more about the IMPC please visit stand 4132.

We will be tweeting relevant research and news during the conference so please follow us on Twitter for updates. We are also adding guest blog posts from attendees presenting research that utilize mouse models. As well as documentation and information about our latest research, we will also be giving out coasters, pens, notebooks and toy mice. Please don’t hesitate to come to our stand if you are interested in hearing more about the IMPC!

What is the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium?

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is an international effort to identify the function of every gene in the mouse genome. The entire genome of many species has now been published and whole genome sequencing is becoming relatively quick and cheap to complete. Despite these advancements the function of the majority of genes remains unknown.

This is where the IMPC comes in, with the goal of phenotyping all 20,000 or so protein coding mouse genes. To achieve this, genes in the mouse genome are switched off then standardised physiological tests undertaken across a range of biological systems. This data is then made freely available to the research community. As well as completing large scale comparative studies, the overall aim of the project is to create a platform for this data where researchers/clinicians can search for genes or diseases of interest to help them understand human health and disease.

IMPC data can be used in a variety of ways, such as to investigate basic biology mechanisms that can lead to new therapeutic targets or to narrow down a suspected list of genes in patients. In the last few years the IMPC have made major discoveries in parts of the genome that were hitherto unexplored, with new genes discovered relating to areas such as deafness, diabetes, and rare diseases. Summaries of five recent research articles that highlight the diversity of how IMPC data can be used are listed below.

More information on the objectives and background of the IMPC can be found on our main website: https://www.mousephenotype.org/objectives-and-background

We are excited to be attending the the ASHG 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego next week. We are looking forward to engaging with researchers and to raise awareness of the IMPC as a resource. If you are attending the conference and want to learn more about the IMPC please visit stand 225 in the non-profit section of the exhibition hall. We will be tweeting relevant research and news during the conference so please follow us on Twitter for updates. We are also adding guest blog posts from attendees presenting research that utilize mouse models, click here to read them.

As well as documentation and information about the latest research , we will also be giving out coasters, pens, notebooks and toy mice. Please don’t hesitate to come to our stand if you are interested in hearing more about the IMPC or if you want to pick up some handouts. Pilar Cacheiro and Damian Smedley will also be presenting research that mentions IMPC resources, both on Wednesday the 17th, and we will have copies of the poster on the stand. More information on the aims and uses of IMPC can be found below.

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is an international effort to identify the function of every gene in the mouse genome. The entire genome of many species has now been published and whole genome sequencing is becoming relatively quick and cheap to complete. Despite these advancements the function of the majority of genes remains unknown.

This is where the IMPC comes in, with the goal of phenotyping all 20,000 or so protein coding mouse genes. To achieve this, genes in the mouse genome are switched off then standardised physiological tests undertaken across a range of biological systems. This data is then made freely available to the research community. As well as completing large scale comparative studies, the overall aim of the project is to create a platform for this data where researchers/clinicians can search for genes or diseases of interest to help them understand human health and disease.

IMPC data can be used in a variety of ways, such as to investigate basic biology mechanisms that can lead to new therapeutic targets or to narrow down a suspected list of genes in patients. In the last few years the IMPC have made major discoveries in parts of the genome that were hitherto unexplored, with new genes discovered relating to areas such as deafness, diabetes, and rare diseases. Summaries of five recent research articles that highlight the diversity of how IMPC data can be used are listed below. These include inferring mammalian gene function, studies on specific human conditions, sex differences in medical research, and even using IMPC data to help in wildlife conservation.

We are excited to be attending the Europhysiology 2018 conference this week at the QEII Centre in London. We are looking forward to engaging with clinicians and researchers to raise awareness of the IMPC as a resource. If you are attending the conference and want to learn more about the IMPC please visit stand 50 on the fifth floor. The conference coincides with the autumn issue of Physiology News, The Physiological Society’s quarterly magazine, in which there is a feature on IMPC. We will be tweeting relevant research and news during the conference so please follow us on Twitter for updates, or keep up to date with the conference hashtag #Europhysiology2018.

As well as documentation and the latest IMPC research, we will also be giving out coasters, pens, notebooks and toy mice. We are also providing a £20 amazon voucher as part of the passport competition. Please don’t hesitate to come to our stand if you are interested in hearing more about the IMPC or if you want to pick up some handouts. More information on the aims and uses of IMPC can be found below.

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is an international effort to identify the function of every gene in the mouse genome. The entire genome of many species has now been published and whole genome sequencing is becoming relatively quick and cheap to complete. Despite these advancements the function of the majority of genes remains unknown.

This is where the IMPC comes in, with the goal of phenotyping all 20,000 or so protein coding mouse genes. To achieve this genes in the mouse genome are switched off, or ‘knocked out’, then standardised physiological tests undertaken across a range of biological systems known as ‘phenotyping tests’. This data is then made freely available to the research community. As well as completing large scale comparative studies, the overall aim of the project is to create a platform for this data where researchers/clinicians can search for genes or diseases of interest to help them understand human health and disease.

IMPC data can be used in a variety of ways, such as to investigate basic biology mechanisms that can lead to new therapeutic targets or to narrow down a suspected list of genes in patients. In the last few years the IMPC have made major discoveries in parts of the genome that were hitherto unexplored, with new genes discovered relating to areas such as deafness, diabetes, and rare diseases. Summaries of five recent research articles that highlight the diversity of how IMPC data can be used are listed below. These include inferring mammalian gene function, studies on specific human conditions, sex differences in medical research, and even using IMPC data to help in wildlife conservation.

More information on the objectives and background of the IMPC can be found on our main website: https://www.mousephenotype.org/objectives-and-background

Advancing Rare Disease Research and Gene Therapy Applications with Animal Models

The second Stakeholder Meeting of INFRAFRONTIER, the European Research Infrastructure for phenotyping and archiving of model mammalian genomes, will be jointly organized with the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. Thematic focus of the meeting is on advancing Rare Disease research and gene therapy applications with animal models.

The Stakeholder Meeting provides an excellent opportunity to support a better alignment of INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC platforms with current Rare Disease research and personalised medicine initiatives, and supports interactions with human genetics centers and clinical consortia. New partnerships can support the rapid impact of mouse functional genomics analyses on the understanding of human genetic variation and disease, and the translation into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

The Stakeholder Meeting will be structured into three main parts:

  • Advancing Rare Disease research with animal models
  • Gene therapy applications using animal models
  • Young Investigator / Stakeholder presentations

Meeting aims are to:

  • Raise awareness of INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC platforms among the Rare Disease community
  • Present use cases for the utility of animal models to advance Rare Disease research
  • Share advances in gene therapy applications, including gene-editing approaches to cure human diseases
  • Strengthen interactions with Rare Disease and clinical research consortia
  • Support presentation of use cases by Young Investigators

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Fatima Bosch, UAB,  ES
  • Steve Brown, MRC Harwell,  UK
  • Jacob Corn, ETH Zurich,  CH
  • Colin Fletcher, NIH,  USA
  • Pietro Genovese, SR-TIGET,  IT
  • Melissa Haendel, Oregon Health & Science University,  USA
  • Yann Herault, PHENOMIN-ICS,  FR
  • Martin Hrabě de Angelis, Helmholtz Zentrum München & INFRAFRONTIER GmbH,  GE
  • Fabio Mammano, CNR-IBCN,  IT
  • Federico Mingozzi, Spark Therapeutics,  IT
  • Lluis Montoliu, CSIC-CNB,  ES
  • Anna Need, GenomicsEngland,  UK
  • Helene Puccio, IGBMC,  FR
  • Olaf Riess, University of Tübingen,  GE
  • Paula Rio, CIEMAT/CIBERER-ISCIII,  ES
  • Wolfgang Wurst, Helmholtz Zentrum München,  GE

 

For more information please visit the INFRAFRONTIER website: INFRAFRONTIER / IMPC Stakeholder Meeting 2018

For updates on the meeting please follow INFRAFRONTIER on Twitter: https://twitter.com/InfrafrontierEU

We are excited to be attending the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) 2018 conference this weekend in Milan! Visit stand 280 to find out more about the IMPC and to pick up contact information and handouts. We will be tweeting relevant research and news during the conference so please follow us on Twitter for updates.

As well as exhibiting, Pilar Cacheiro, Damian Smedley & Violeta Munoz Fuentes will also be discussing the IMPC in a workshop, poster & talk:

The IMPC recently exhibited at the BCS Annual Conference for the first time. The aim of attending conferences such as this is to engage with clinicians and researchers working on human disease models to raise awareness of the IMPC as a resource. The BCS Annual Conference 2018 was a great example of this and we had many interested attendees visiting the stand. Visitors ranged from researchers that had already used IMPC resources and were keen to hear updates, to those that were unaware of what we do and were interested in understanding how the IMPC may benefit their work.

To highlight how the IMPC could be used as a resource for cardiovascular research we talked attendees through the cardiovaducalr landing page.

More information on cardiovascular research and the IMPC

The cardiovascular system refers to the observable morphological and physiological characteristics of the mammalian heart, blood vessels, or circulatory system that are manifested through development and lifespan.
So far a total of 4804 genes have been tested for cardiovascular phenotypes, ranging from Increased Heart Weight to Increased Cardiac Muscle Contractility.

Genes with phenotype associations relating to the Cardiovascular System

 

There have already been many studies on the cardiovascular system that have featured IMPC data and resources. A full list can be found on the cardiovaducalr landing page, and a selection of highlights listed below:

 

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By IMPC

Published 8th June 2018

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